Fascinating Reasons Why Millennials Should Invest in the Stock Market

Income-driven millennials will likely become multi-millionaire investors in the future. However, venturing into the risky world of investing can be a great challenge for the young generations. Nonetheless, the market sector has higher earning potential among other investment options, below are some of the many compelling reasons why the young demographics must invest in the stock market:

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Easier Access

Apart from global economic growth, the rapid pace of technology advancement has transformed the way we trade stocks, today. Millennial investors can take advantage of the efficient trading tools such as cloud-based software and online trading platforms, developed to provide easier access to investors and keep track their investments anytime, anywhere.

 

Has a Variety of Safe and Profitable Investments

Alongside with Finance, the Tech sector has been one of the best-performing stocks in the market, for years. In terms of revenue, large companies like Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon are highly recognized as the most dominant tech stocks in the market. As they remain robust and successful despite economic crisis and uncertainties.

 

A Great Wealth Builder

Saving earlier for stable and financially secured golden years can be the best thing every millennial should learn. For instance, Warren Buffet, widely acclaimed as the richest business tycoon in the investment history was known to have built his fortune by trading in the stock market decades back until to date, following Benjamin Graham’s principles of value investing, according to Forbes.

 

 

 

Repost: December Slide Tumbles Markets for the 2018 Year

Here’s an update for December’s Stock Market performance and global economic concerns from LOM Financial:

The month of December was once again dominated by troubling economic headlines ranging from disruptive global trade negotiations to disturbing U.S. central bank commentary. On top of the steady drum beat of what some are calling dysfunctional political behavior, the U.S. Government’s partial shutdown has added to the negative investor sentiment which has been building all year. Sliding stock prices over the last month of the year added to the fourth quarter market woes, notwithstanding a sharp equity market reversal on the day after Christmas. For the month of December, the S&P 500 declined by -9.03% and the MSCI World Stock index fell by -7.57%. These results capped an overall tumultuous year where the MSCI World declined by 8.19% for the period as a whole.

 

Since the U.S. and China met during the G20 meeting at the beginning of December, China has implemented multiple policies addressing major issues in trade war negotiations. China agreed to cut tariffs on more than 700 goods in sectors such as agriculture, pharmaceutical, manufacturing and materials. Despite the progress, most products will still be subject to the retaliatory tariffs until there is a breakthrough in the trade deal. Furthermore, China has drafted a law to prevent forced technology transfers, which is a main complaint by Washington. However, critics question whether the new law will be enforced successfully. U.S. trade representatives will travel to China in January for another round of negotiations and any update from their talk will likely affect markets early in the New Year.

 

Despite the ongoing risk market selloff in during the fourth quarter, the Fed still decided to raise the Fed Fund rate for the fourth time in 2018, to a range between 2.25% and 2.5%. However, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) did adjust next year’s projected base rate move downward to just two hikes, in the face of market volatility. However, Fed Chairman, Jerome Powell reiterated the plan for balance sheet runoff. As the Fed downplayed risks to the economic outlook, investors worry that a hawkish central bank will ultimately slow the economy and send markets into another tail spin. As interest rates continues to climb, consumers will feel even more pressure on mortgages and auto loan payments. Overall, businesses have begun to experience a higher interest burden.

 

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